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Eagle Archive: County birthday event notes family divided by Civil War

The Historical Society of Carroll County will mark its annual celebration of the founding of Carroll County Saturday, Jan. 19, with a presentation on the letters and documents which shed additional light on the divided loyalties of the Shriver family during the American Civil War.

According to local historian Catherine Baty, curator of collections at the historical society, speaker Helen MacSherry will discuss, in particular, the Union Mills Homestead Foundation's project to transcribe and publish the documents, letters and diaries written by the Shriver family during the Civil War.

The family arrived in Philadelphia in 1721. Andrew Shriver (1712-1797) came here from the Palatine Electorate in Germany.

A definitive account of the divided loyalties of the family during the Civil War, "The Shrivers: Under Two Flags," was originally published by family descendant, David Shriver Lovelace, in 2003.

In it, he describes how Andrew Shriver Sr. "settled just east of Littlestown" in 1733. A family history published by the Maryland Historical Society reports that his son, David Shriver Sr. (1735-1826), moved to Frederick County.

"Union Mills is located seven miles north of Westminster, Maryland and was founded by David Shriver's son — David Shriver Jr. (1769-1852) and Andrew Shriver (1762-1847), in 1797," the book notes.

Lovelace observes in his book that, "Maryland, as a Civil War border state, found many of her families divided …in their loyalties between the North and South. These differences played out in the living rooms and parlors on the home front."

The well-known historical account detailing Carroll County during the Civil War, "Just South of Gettysburg," by Frederic Shriver Klein, W. Harold Redcay and G. Thomas LeGore, explains "the way in which the Civil War divided members of the same family in Maryland. … Two brothers, William Shriver and Andrew K. Shriver, lived on opposite sides of the road at the time of the Civil War, and the sympathies of the two brothers and their families took opposite sides as the war progressed.

"Strangely enough, William Shriver's family members, who were sympathizers with the southern cause, did not own any Negro slaves at the time of the war; yet Andrew K. Shriver's family, who were Northern sympathizers, owned a few Negro slaves as household servants, and kept them until slavery was abolished."

"Personal letters from the two Shriver families illustrate the different interpretations and attitudes of Northern and Southern sympathizers, when both Confederate troops and Union troops were stationed in the Union Mills area in the same twenty-four hours," right before the Battle of Gettysburg.

The Jan. 19 celebration is free and open to the public, 2-4 p.m. in Holy Cross Hall, Church of the Ascension, on Court Street in Westminster. For information, call 410-848-6494.

When he is not writing letters to family and friends, Kevin Dayhoff may be reached at kevindayhoff@gmail.com.

The Historical Society of Carroll County will mark its annual celebration of the founding of Carroll County Saturday, Jan. 19, with a presentation on the letters and documents which shed additional light on the divided loyalties of the Shriver family during the American Civil War.

According to local historian Catherine Baty, curator of collections at the historical society, speaker Helen MacSherry will discuss, in particular, the Union Mills Homestead Foundation's project to transcribe and publish the documents, letters and diaries written by the Shriver family during the Civil War.

The Shriver family originally arrived in Philadelphia in 1721. Andrew Shriver (1712-1797) came here from the Palatine Electorate in Germany.

A definitive account of the divided loyalties of the Shriver family during the Civil War, "The Shrivers: Under Two Flags," was originally published by family descendant, David Shriver Lovelace, in 2003.

In it, he describes how Andrew Shriver Sr. "settled just east of Littlestown" in 1733. An old family history published by the Maryland Historical Society in August 1977 reports that his son, David Shriver Sr. (1735-1826), moved to Frederick County.

"Union Mills is located seven miles north of Westminster, Maryland and was founded by David Shriver's son — David Shriver Jr. (1769-1852) and Andrew Shriver (1762-1847), in 1797," the book notes.

Lovelace observes in his book that, "Maryland, as a Civil War border state, found many of her families divided …in their loyalties between the North and South. These differences played out in the living rooms and parlors on the home front."

The well-known historical account detailing Carroll County during the Civil War, "Just South of Gettysburg," by Frederic Shriver Klein, W. Harold Redcay and G. Thomas LeGore, explains "the way in which the Civil War divided members of the same family in Maryland. … Two brothers, William Shriver and Andrew K. Shriver, lived on opposite sides of the road at the time of the Civil War, and the sympathies of the two brothers and their families took opposite sides as the war progressed.

"Strangely enough, William Shriver's family members, who were sympathizers with the southern cause, did not own any Negro slaves at the time of the war; yet Andrew K. Shriver's family, who were Northern sympathizers, owned a few Negro slaves as household servants, and kept them until slavery was abolished."

"Personal letters from the two Shriver families illustrate the different interpretations and attitudes of Northern and Southern sympathizers, when both Confederate troops and Union troops were stationed in the Union Mills area in the same twenty-four hours," right before the Battle of Gettysburg.

The Jan. 19 birthday celebration for Carroll County is free and open to the public.

The program will be held from 2 to 4 p.m. in Holy Cross Hall, Church of the Ascension, on Court Street in Westminster.

For information, call 410-848-6494.

When he is not writing letters to family and friends, Kevin Dayhoff may be reached at kevindayhoff@gmail.com.

Copyright © 2014, The Baltimore Sun
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