On Sept. 10, St. Paul's School celebrated the LEED gold certification of its Fisher Hall with the dedication of a plaque at the site. At right is St. Paul's Chief Financial Officer Rob McArthur and Laurie Fisher, widow of David Fisher. At left are his children, their spouses, and his grandchildren. (Submitted photo / September 13, 2011)

St. Paul's School in Brooklandville held a ceremony on Sept. 10 celebrating the school's Fisher Hall, a new building housing the library and student commons area for its Upper School, has been awarded LEED Gold certification by the U.S. Green Building Council. LEED — Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design — is a program recognizing design, construction and operation of high-performance green buildings.

Some of the features that helped the building attain gold certification include 35 percent water use reduction through low-flow fixtures and other technologies; geothermal heating and cooling system; a high-efficiency HVAC system; and a roof composed of native and adaptive vegetation.

School officials said the decision to pursue LEED certification for Fisher Hall was led by its namesake, school trustee David Fisher, who served as a docent of theChesapeake Bay Foundation.

Fisher died unexpectedly on July 31, days after learning of Fisher Hall's gold certification. In addition to serving as co-chair of the school's recently completed $25 million capital campaign, he had been a leader in environmental initiatives at St. Paul's.


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A plaque recognizing the building's gold certification was unveiled at a reception in Fisher Hall on Sept. 10, immediately following a memorial service for Fisher in the school's chapel.

"Dave Fisher was a champion for environmental causes and a champion of thissSchool," said Headmaster Thomas Reid. "The building will stand as a lasting legacy to Dave, and help ensure that generations of students truly understand how we impact our environment."

Trio of graduates honored at African American Cultural Festival

Ugonnaya Obineme, a graduate of Loch Raven High School, is one of three former Baltimore County Public Schools students who will receive scholarships at the county's African American Cultural Festival.

Obineme, a 2011 graduate, is now majoring in chemistry atUniversity of Maryland, Baltimore County.

The festival is scheduled for Saturday, Sept., 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., at Patriots Plaza, 400 Washington Ave.,Towson.

BCPS Superintendent Joe Hairston will attend the festival and extend congratulations to the three BCPS graduates — Obineme; Dorian Issac, a graduate of Milford Mill Academy; and Amala Edwards, a graduate of Western School of Technology and Environmental Science — who will receive scholarships at the festival. The three will receive scholarships of $1,500 each.

In addition to entertainment, vendors, and food, the festival features historic tributes, exhibits, local talent showcases, recreational activities for children, a narrated bus tour of Baltimore County's historic communities, and information tables representing nonprofit organizations, and federal, state, and county agencies.

Funds raised from the festival help to sponsor underserved children in attending summer camp, provide scholarship funds to students, and assist in the preservation of historic African American artifacts and landmarks throughout the county.

Burgers on the menu for Ridgely Middle fundraiser

The Student Government Association at Ridgely Middle School is hosting a Boardwalk and Burgers Night on Thursday, Sept. 15, 4 to 9 p.m. at Boardwalk Burgers and Fries in the Hunt Valley Town Center. The SGA will get a percentage of all proceeds from the evening sales.