Already, the small playhouse on the playground has been put together again by a parent of one of the school's preschoolers for children to use.

The picnic table will eventually be repaired, too, according Charlie Engebrecht, a member of the property board.

"Us old fogies want cooler weather," Engebrecht chuckled, of the volunteers who do the majority of the repairs.

Often, it is Engebrecht and Geigley who do the work, from fixing the knocked out fence rails around the storm water pond to removing the discarded furniture in the area. The two have also washed off graffiti on the playground equipment.


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Other times, help is needed. Several years ago, a glass door was shot, shattering it. The church's large garage door was also destroyed after someone rammed into it several times. The new door has a chain across it to prevent anyone from getting too close.

Because the new playground was funded by a grant, the church cannot fence it or the property, according to Engebrecht.

"It is supposed to be used by the community," Engebrecht said.

The damages have cost the church thousands of dollars, even with the time contributed by volunteers.

"Volunteers have put everything back together again," Lebo said. "They do the painting and the repairs."

A police report was filed after the paper recycling receptacle was set on fire and another report was filed regarding the picnic table.

Baltimore County Police at the Wilkins Station have promised to patrol the area more frequently throughout the evening.

In the afternoon, an officer usually has lunch and works on reports in the parking lot.

"The police have been very helpful," Geigley said.

A few blocks down the road, Arbutus United Methodist Church has been fortunate, according to a staff member, in that there has been no major vandalism over the years outside of some graffiti.

Geigley has a theory why Holy Nativity has been targeted and it has to with its location at Linden and Shelbourne Road.

"We are in a corner here," Geigle said. "We see a lot of people walking across the property."