Z on TV Critic David Zurawik writes about the business and culture of TV

'SNL' rises to new heights in war on Trump's disinformation

We talked about "Saturday Night Live" on CNN's "Reliable Sources," and it was all praise for this week's wicked satire of Donald Trump's craziest week yet.

I told host Brian Stelter that as much as I loved Melissa McCarthy in New York City on a motorized podium as White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer, it was "Weekend Update" that impressed me most.

Michael Che and Colin Jost are batting about .800 with their political humor and they are doing something that's largely going unnoticed. They are making jokes that show how Trump's messy use of language is actually a tool he uses to evade being pinned down.

You can see me explaining that on "Reliable Sources" here.

If SNL were only ridiculing Spicer because he is awful at his job, I would not be impressed.

But it's doing something far more complicated and important to democracy: It is communicating through razor-sharp satire the way the White House press room has become the mouth of a river of disinformation, obfuscation and lies spewing from the White House.

Democracies need sound information to function. Some of that is expected to come from elected leaders under the watchful eyes of the press. But with Trump as president and Spicer as his press secretary, it is all anger, madness and lies.

Check out the video here.

And then, check out videos of some of the other segments. Stelter and his producers put together a killer show with Jeffrey Toobin and Carl Bernstein nailing the gravity of what Trump did in firing FBI Director James Comey this week. Also, Michael Sherer, of Time magazine, offered keen analysis of Trump as a TV president.

See Bernstein here.

See Sherer here.

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