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Z on TV

Z on TV Critic David Zurawik writes about the business and culture of TV
Why are moderators, anchors hugging, kissing up to candidates so much?

Hugs, kisses, contributions and flat-out shilling – what’s going on between TV anchors and politicians in this crazed election season anyway? And why does so much of this kissing up involve the Clintons?

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Frank Underwood opens 'campaign office' in South Carolina ahead of primary

I don't like promotional campaigns for TV shows very much. But I am so psyched about the March 4 debut of Season 4  of "House of Cards" that I am starting to get into this one — posting trailers and other gimmicks from Netflix.

It's all meant to manipulate, of course. But why would anyone expect anything less from anything connected to Frank Underwood?

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HBO's 'Vinyl' hits TV high with Martin Scorsese

Transcendence, music, sex, drugs, capitalism and the American soul — that's the stuff of which HBO's "Vinyl" is made. And even by the "golden age" standards of TV drama today, that makes for moments of extraordinary television.

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Here's the latest trailer for 'House of Cards' Season 4

Netflix has released the latest trailer for Season 4 of "House of Cards."

Beyond the sense that there is still a lot of trouble in the marriage of Frank and Claire Underwood, you tell me what it means.

But it feels, hot, fast, nasty, dangerous, sexy and full of treachery.

That's good enough for me.

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Five media takeaways from New Hampshire election night coverage

Five media takeaways from New Hampshire primary night coverage:

1. As much as it wants to be considered a mainstream news organization, Fox News still marches to its own ideological drummer.

When Bernie Sanders, who swamped Hillary Clinton on the Democratic side, took to the podium for his victory speech tonight, every channel that I sampled carried it full screen.

But not Fox News.

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Warnock TV ad spending nears $600,000 in Baltimore mayor's race

Businessman David Warnock has spent almost $600,000 for TV ads in the Baltimore mayoral race.

And that is just on network-owned or -affiliated stations, like WJZ and WBAL, that are governed by the Federal Communications Commission, which requires public filing on such sales.

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