At the beginning of his acting career, Daniel Gillies played “Cute Guy” in an episode of the syndicated series “Cleopatra 2525.” He hasn’t been feeling all that cute on the set of “The Vampire Diaries.”

“Everyone is so much better looking than I am!” said Gillies, who plays vampire Elijah on the CW hit. “And I’m not just playing at humility there… These kids are so pretty and talented and, you know, [bleep] them all!

“No, kidding! But I certainly don’t feel like the cute guy any more.”

We’ll see Gillies and his impossibly attractive co-stars again in “As I Lay Dying,” the season finale airing at 7 p.m. Thursday on CW. And maybe we’ll learn what Elijah plans to do with his brother and fellow original vamp, Klaus (Joseph Morgan), after he betrayed Elena (Nina Dobrev) and Stefan (Paul Wesley) last week by not killing his brother. (We’ll also learn why Klaus was so desperate to keep Stefan alive during last week’s sacrifice ritual.)

But back to that “not cute” comment. True, there are a lot of lookers in the cast, but fans will tell the 35-year-old actor he is wrong about one thing: The guy is handsome. Elijah came to Mystic Falls about mid-season hoping to use Elena to set a trap for Klaus. Instantly, online chat rooms, message boards and my Twitter feed filled with messages of, well, let’s call it “support,” for the sexy new guy.

“When cute erodes, there are other things that hopefully take the place of cute,” Gillies said.

I’m guessing, by watching Gillies as Elijah, he’s talking about a sense of humor, sophistication, style and, most importantly, swagger.

“I’m really enjoying embracing those as I get older,” he said. “It’s taken me awhile, but I like me more than I did when, perhaps, I was a cute guy.”

What do you think, cute, handsome, sexy or...? Please leave your comments below.

Hi Daniel. I just have to say, you double-crossing fiend! How could you?
[Laughs.] I don’t regret it at all. I think it was such a human decision he made. When I watched it, it seemed that, as much as the audience really resents him in that moment, or a lot of them [do], I think that it was one of the most human things he’s done. It was the closest I ever felt to him when I watched it.

He’s taken Klaus. Is he hoping to revive his family, or does he have a plan?
I think he knows as little as you do. I don’t know what his hope is, but he had to take that chance on Klaus’ word. I do think that there’s no guarantee, at all, to anything that Klaus is saying. I don’t think he knows what to expect as far as the family or the bodies. But if there’s even a percentage chance [Klaus is telling the truth], he has to take that risk.

What most concerns Elijah about Klaus’ possible transformation into a werewolf-vampire hybrid?
The degree of invincibility. My concern is whether or not he’s going to have a need for me. And that’s got to occur to Elijah. He’s now more of a threat than ever. His ability to go and procreate is also terrifying.

Speaking of procreating, should Klaus and the hybrids be allowed to date werewolves, vampires, humans or only other hybrids?
[Laughs.] I think they can date whomever the hell they want. As long as there is consent, they can date whomever.

Is Elijah jealous of his brother, or is it just fear of how it could all end so badly?
I think he’s been alive too long to sort of waste his energy on things like jealousy. I think if we had the ability to live several lifetimes I think that we could dispose of that. I think Elijah has more compassion than we know.

Do you feel Elijah is more like Stefan or Damon?
I don’t think he’s like either. He’s his own creature. Look, he treats a lot of things with a degree of humor. I find Elijah [to be] very funny. I guess I’m laughing at my own joke, but I enjoy playing the humor. It’s not necessarily on the [script] page, but I like playing a lot of what he does with a degree of sort of amusement. I think there’s something Damon-esque about that.

I do think he has an enormous sense of responsibility, which is more like Stefan. But truthfully, he’s like neither of them. He’s too old to be like either of them. It’s like which one of them is like him. He’s been around for thousands of years; they’re just beginning to explore what it means to be alive.

In the flashbacks he seems more sensitive than he is now.
Yeah, that was fun to play. I played him with a degree of more openness. He’s already made the decision there, he says, “I do not believe in love, Katerina.” I think by that stage he’s made sort of that psychological decision, but I don’t think his heart has made the decision. In fact, it’s clear that he hasn’t. But he’s certainly not as hardened as he is in contemporary times. He’s much more of an assassin when we see him now. He’s had to survive the pursuit of Klaus.

Are we going to see their dynamic change a little bit now that Elijah is seemingly in control?
It depends on what direction they go with this. I don’t know where they’re going to go. I doubt that Elijah would want to continue to be around Klaus after what he’s done. I’m not sure that’d be together enough to enable a dynamic.

Julie Plec has said that watching you play Elijah made her and Kevin decide to make the Originals unkillable. And obviously they’ve kept your characters around. How does it feel to play God in that way?
[Laughs.] That’s very sweet. But they’re not unkillable. There’s a way to get them; there’s always a way. It’s amazingly gratifying to play this role in this show. I feel very, very lucky is the answer to that question. I’ve never played anything that’s had such a following, and believe me, I know there are some pretty entitled young actors out there who think they’ve got it coming to them. But I’m 35 and I feel very blessed to be doing this.

What are you hoping for Elijah next season if he survives the Season 2 finale?
If he survives I want him to have love. I think he’s found love; I just want him to be able to express it.