Black Aggie

Looming over the grave of Gen. Felix Agnus beginning in 1925, this haunting black figure patterned after Augustus St. Gaudens Grief spent some 40 years spooking visitors to Druid Ridge Cemetery in Pikesville. No grass was said to grow in its shadow. Pregnant women were said to miscarry if they wandered too near, and college fraternities delighted in forcing their pledges to spend a night in Aggie's arms. The statue, removed from Druid Ridge in 1967, now sits in a Washington, D.C. Courtyard.

( Bill O'Leary/Baltimore Sun / April 17, 2013 )

Looming over the grave of Gen. Felix Agnus beginning in 1925, this haunting black figure patterned after Augustus St. Gaudens Grief spent some 40 years spooking visitors to Druid Ridge Cemetery in Pikesville. No grass was said to grow in its shadow. Pregnant women were said to miscarry if they wandered too near, and college fraternities delighted in forcing their pledges to spend a night in Aggie's arms. The statue, removed from Druid Ridge in 1967, now sits in a Washington, D.C. Courtyard.

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