Unlimited Access. Try it Today! Your First 10 Days Always $0.99

Movies

Entertainment Movies

Sparks and surprises in 'Safe Haven' ★★

The new Nicholas Sparks movie, "Safe Haven," takes place in Southport, in the novelist's adopted home state of North Carolina. Southport is near the mouth of the Cape Fear River. So you know a murderous stalker will eventually arrive, in honor of Robert Mitchum in "Cape Fear."

It's a new wrinkle to have a Sparks plot so dependent on thriller and mystery elements, some of them surprise-dependent and therefore off-limits for the purposes of the latest two-star review of the latest adequate Sparks adaptation. Prologue: A desperate young woman played by Julianne Hough flees the scene of a crime in Boston, under the cloak of night, with a fiercely dedicated police detective (David Lyons) on her tail.

Assuming a new haircut and a tight-lipped persona, Katie gets off the bus at Southport, secures a job at the local waterfront diner in 10 minutes flat, rents a picturesque cabin in the woods 10 minutes or so later and soon begins trading cautious yet demurely smoldering glances with the local general store proprietor. He is portrayed by Josh Duhamel, and his character — a widower with two children — is the safe haven of the title.

Katie has something to hide; the detective has someone to find; Duhamel's Alex has some grieving to put behind him; director Lasse Hallstrom has some sunsets and canoeing montages to shoot in order to pass the time before things grow violent and threatening and then go calm and upbeat again, the way they do in Sparks movies.

I like Duhamel, and in her first straight-up dramatic role Hough does well enough, though her singing and/dancing career thus far has trained her to oversell, as opposed to sell, as opposed to act naturally. As for Jo, the mysterious single woman who befriends Katie: She's played by Cobie Smulders, and she too has a secret to reveal. You may find yourself way, way out ahead of her news as you watch the sunsets and the golden close-ups drift by. Alex and Katie's courtship, for the record, begins with a coffee shop chat on the nutritional merits of kale, moves on to a late-night dance at a bait and tackle shop and culminates in discreet lovemaking in the moonlit cabin in the woods. Sparks knows his audience: This is such stuff as paperback-rack and February multiplex dreams are made on.

mjphillips@tribune.com

'Safe Haven' -- 2 stars
MPAA rating:
PG-13 (for thematic material involving threatening behavior, and for violence and sexuality)
Running time: 1:55
Opens: Thursday

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
Related Content
  • 10 movies to see this winter
    10 movies to see this winter

    Tribune movie critic Michael Phillips picks 10 movies you should see in the coming months.

  • Top 50 superhero movies of the last 10 years
    Top 50 superhero movies of the last 10 years

    Since 2002 there have been arguably 50 movies about superheroes. Arguably, because genre is tricky; it's often variations on a theme, and some variations are less obvious than others. ("Star Wars," for instance, a bit of a space western, is no one's picture of the western genre.) Oh, also: Because...

  • 'Beautiful Creatures': Supernatural love in a small town, again ★★
    'Beautiful Creatures': Supernatural love in a small town, again ★★

    When classy, pedigreed British actors go hog-wild under the flowering dogwood trees of a Southern Gothic setting, often the results are good. Just as often they're so bad they're good. And sometimes, as is the case with Jeremy Irons and Emma Thompson in "Beautiful Creatures," they're simply doing...

  • Review: 'Clouds of Sils Maria'
    Review: 'Clouds of Sils Maria'

    Now 60, and always more of a wry classicist than a maverick, the writer-director Olivier Assayas is one of the steadiest and most reliable filmmakers in contemporary cinema. I like his latest, "Clouds of Sils Maria," a great deal; it's beautifully acted and has a few wise (if familiar) things to...

  • Review: 'The Salt of the Earth'
    Review: 'The Salt of the Earth'

    Watching "The Salt of the Earth," the compelling new documentary about photographer Sebastiao Salgado, it becomes clear early on just how odd it is to experience Salgado's work on someone else's timetable. With an exhibition or a book of photographs, you set your own clock, spending as much time...

  • Review: 'Monkey Kingdom'
    Review: 'Monkey Kingdom'

    Compile all the sufferings and adversities heaped upon all the vulnerable protagonists in the complete works of Charles Dickens, from "Little Dorrit" to "Oliver Twist," and you'd still fall short of the 81 minutes of hardship endured by Maya, the simian heroine of Disneynature's new nature documentary...

  • Review: 'True Story'
    Review: 'True Story'

    "True Story" is a case of a well-crafted film, made by a first-time feature director with an impressive theatrical pedigree, that nonetheless struggles to locate the reasons for telling its story.

  • In 'Unfriended,' horror comes to life online
    In 'Unfriended,' horror comes to life online

    The new horror flick "Unfriended," which opens April 17, unfolds completely on a computer screen. In the film a teenager and her friends are terrorized by a digital stalker seeking revenge for a shaming video that led to a suicide.

Comments
Loading

64°