Unlimited Access. Try it Today! Your First 10 Days Always $0.99
Entertainment Movies

Dylan Farrow speaks out about abuse accusations against Woody Allen

Woody Allen's adopted daughter Dylan Farrow on Saturday repeated — and elaborated on — her assertion that the filmmaker sexually assaulted her when she was a child.

Farrow's open letter, published on the New York Times website, is part of a renewed public scrutiny of allegations first leveled against Allen in 1992, shortly after the end of his relationship with actress Mia Farrow. In a Vanity Fair story published in October, Dylan Farrow (who now goes by another name) also laid out details of what she said happened to her.

Allen, who has long maintained his innocence, could not be reached for comment Saturday. The New York Times said he declined to comment on the record.

FULL COVERAGE: Movies

In her letter, Farrow said, "When I was 7 years old, Woody Allen took me by the hand and led me into a dim, closet-like attic on the second floor of our house. He told me to lay on my stomach and play with my brother's electric train set. Then he sexually assaulted me." She also alleged a pattern of abuse throughout her childhood.

"Woody Allen was never convicted of any crime," Farrow wrote. "That he got away with what he did to me haunted me as I grew up."

Farrow said she was speaking out now because of Allen's recent accolades in Hollywood. The director's latest film, "Blue Jasmine," has been nominated for three Academy Awards.

Allen also received the Cecil B. DeMille Award for lifetime achievement at this year's Golden Globes ceremony. After Diane Keaton accepted that award on Allen's behalf, Ronan Farrow, Allen's son with Mia Farrow, wrote on Twitter: "Missed the Woody Allen tribute — did they put the part where a woman publicly confirmed he molested her at age 7 before or after Annie Hall?" Mia Farrow tweeted the next day: "A woman has publicly detailed Woody Allen's molestation of her at age 7. Golden Globe tribute showed contempt for her & all abuse survivors."

PHOTOS: Woody Allen's highest-grossing films

Mia Farrow and Allen ended their relationship in 1992 after Farrow learned that Allen had become involved with Soon-Yi Previn, Farrow's adopted daughter with composer Andre Previn. During a subsequent custody battle, Farrow accused Allen of sexually molesting Dylan. The allegations triggered a criminal inquiry by the Connecticut State Police. An investigative team from the Yale-New Haven Hospital concluded, after a six-month inquiry, that Dylan had not been molested. Allen was never charged.

Robert Weide, a screenwriter, director and producer who made a documentary on Allen for PBS' "American Masters" series in 2011, wrote a long story on the controversy in the Daily Beast last week, casting doubt on the accusations. "If I wrote it today, it would be exactly the same piece," he said after the Dylan Farrow letter was released.

glenn.whipp@latimes.com

ALSO:

Maximilian Schell dies at 83

"Her," "Captain Phillips" win Writers Guild awards

Academy president about Oscar song: "It's not about punishment"

PHOTOS AND MORE PHOTOS: Faces to watch 2014 | Movies ENVELOPE: The latest awards buzz DOCUMENTARIES: 10 best of 2013, and a new crop in 2014

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
Related Content
  • Review: 'Merchants of Doubt'
    Review: 'Merchants of Doubt'

    Don't underestimate Robert Kenner's "Merchants of Doubt." It may sound like a standard-issue advocacy documentary concerned, as so many are, with the perils of global warming, but it's a lot more than that.

  • Review: 'Home'
    Review: 'Home'

    The cuddliest alien invasion movie ever, "Home" contains nifty turns of phrase and some actual, verifiable verbal wit, owing in large part to its source material, Adam Rex's 2007 children's book "The True Meaning of Smekday."

  • Review: 'Get Hard'
    Review: 'Get Hard'

    An awful lot of "Get Hard" depends on gay-panic humor of a weirdly squirmy and dated sort, making you wonder if this new Will Ferrell/Kevin Hart mystery might best be viewed alongside reissues of "Cruising" and "Norman … Is That You?"

  • Review: '71'
    Review: '71'

    First performed in 1923, following an early chapter in that quaint, understated late 1960s-coined cycle of violence known as the Troubles, Sean O'Casey's play "The Shadow of a Gunman" imagined a crowded tenement house that becomes a microcosm of the Irish War of Independence. A key scene in...

  • Review: 'It Follows'
    Review: 'It Follows'

    A film of slow builds and medium-grade payoffs, "It Follows" imagines a curse represented by a shape-shifting apparition that might be as ordinary-looking as the boy next door. The curse is transmittable only by intercourse, and the infected rid themselves of the deadly phantom by hooking up...

  • Review: 'The Gunman'
    Review: 'The Gunman'

    Speedy brutality is the spoonful of sugar in most action movies, making the narrative medicine go down for as large an international audience as possible. I'm not blowing any surprises by pointing this out. Besides, with "The Gunman," the surprises keep on not coming. You've seen a lot of it...

Comments
Loading