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How 'Twilight' changed them

You already know how “Twilight” has changed the lives of stars Robert Pattinson, Kristen Stewart and Taylor Lautner, who can thank the vampire franchise for their A-list status and lack of private lives. But what sort of impact have the films had on its supporting cast and the artists on the films’ soundtracks — other than earn them thousands of extra Twitter followers?

Here’s what some of the series’ actors — and singer Christina Perri, who sings  the single “A Thousand Years” on the “Breaking Dawn — Part 1” soundtrack — had to say:

Ashley Greene (Alice Cullen): “I feel like not much hasn’t changed. I think the only thing that hasn’t changed are my core friends and family. I worked in a restaurant before I became part of ‘The Twilight Saga.’ I was trying to get a job, and landing one like this is crazy. To go from working at a restaurant to having an incredible fan base and doing press tours all over the world, it’s been amazing.”

Peter Facinelli (Dr. Carlisle Cullen): “It opened up my fan base. It was kind of nice. A lot of fans of ‘Twilight’ went back and watched some of my other work and became fans of mine. Not just from ‘Twilight,’ but my whole body of work. These fan events are phenomenal. I’ve never seen anything like it. Movies like this come around once in a career. Even if you’re in a big movie, they’re not always cultural phenomenons. I feel lucky to be a part of it.”

Nikki Reed (Rosalie Hale): “I got to take my family on our first family vacation in our whole life last year for Christmas. That obviously was because of ‘Twilight.’ I’ve gone all over the world, worked with incredible directors and I think I’ve grown as an actor. At least I hope I have. I also acquired a certain level of patience playing this character and waiting for ‘Breaking Dawn’ to come out.”

Jackson Rathbone (Jasper Hale): “It’s been wonderful (for my music career). The only thing I want to do with my music is have people dance and sing and have a good time. It’s all about the live show. If (‘Twilight’ fans) come and end up enjoying the live show — that’s what I’m hoping for.”

Charlie Bewley (Demetri): “It’s been a springboard toward what I want to do. I was in Vancouver when I got casted. Things were moving along, but this put me under a microscope a little bit. I was able to get a great agent, travel a lot and my bank balance wasn’t so low. I got to expand my horizons, really. Not to the extent some of these guys have experienced it, but it was a wonderful thing to come along.”

Christina Perri: “Because the soundtracks are really kind of epic now, I feel like people on them get global exposure. It’s bananas. You definitely have a shot at being really well-known. … Paramore had two songs on the (2008 ‘Twilight’) soundtrack, and I remember falling in love with them because of it.”

Twitter @aboutluisgomez

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
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