Unlimited Access. Try it Today! Your First 10 Days Always $0.99

Movies

Entertainment Movies

Maryland Film Festival earns record ticket sales

The 14th Maryland Film Festival proved the most popular yet, with ticket sales up from 5 to 10 percent daily and advance sales up more than 25 percent, according to festival officials.

The four-day festival, which ran through Sunday at the Charles Theatre, MICA's Brown Center and the Wind-Up Space, included 22 sold-out screenings, MFF director Jed Dietz said. People had to be turned away from the John Waters pick, "Wanda," the set-in-Baltimore "LUV" and the closing night local premiere of Todd Solondz's "Dark Horse," among other films.

Dietz also estimated that half of the festival's 125 all-access passes were sold even before the weekend's line-up was announced.

The festival, he said, is proving popular with audiences who want to see something outside the Hollywood mainstream.

"I think we've earned the audience's confidence," he said. "There's a lot of film activity out there that people aren't hearing about, and they can sample some of that at the festival."

Advance sales of individual tickets totaled about $27,000, Dietz said. While total numbers won't be tallied for a few days, he estimated overall ticket sales climbed about 15 percent over last year.

Chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com

  • Text NIGHTLIFE to 70701 to sign up for Baltimore Sun nightlife and music text alerts
  • Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
    Related Content
    • Coverage: Maryland Film Festival 2012
      Coverage: Maryland Film Festival 2012

      Get event information, see movie stills and more from this year's Maryland Film Festival.

    • 'Dior and I' a stitch-in-time peek at haute couture creation
      'Dior and I' a stitch-in-time peek at haute couture creation

      They don't call it haute couture for nothing.

    • Review: 'The Water Diviner'
      Review: 'The Water Diviner'

      Russell Crowe's feature directorial debut, "The Water Diviner," stems from an honest impulse to dramatize ordinary people who honor their dead. Yet the results are narratively dishonest and emotionally a little cheap. A single performance lifts the film above the level of mediocrity; more on that...

    • Review: 'Little Boy'
      Review: 'Little Boy'

      "Little Boy" answers a question most tear-jerkers wouldn't have the nerve to ask: Can the bombing of Hiroshima be manipulated narratively, if briefly, into a position of warming our hearts?

    • Review: 'Ex Machina'
      Review: 'Ex Machina'

      A grandly ridiculous theatrical tradition born in ancient Greece, deus ex machina meant, literally, a god borne by a machine descending from the sky to determine a story's outcome.

    • Review: 'The Age of Adaline'
      Review: 'The Age of Adaline'

      Hollywood long ago ceded "love that stands the test of time" to the realm of science fiction and fantasy, so "The Age of Adaline" falls neatly into a genre that includes "The Time Traveler's Wife," "About Time," and even "Somewhere in Time."

    Comments
    Loading

    57°