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Maryland Film Festival earns record ticket sales

The 14th Maryland Film Festival proved the most popular yet, with ticket sales up from 5 to 10 percent daily and advance sales up more than 25 percent, according to festival officials.

The four-day festival, which ran through Sunday at the Charles Theatre, MICA's Brown Center and the Wind-Up Space, included 22 sold-out screenings, MFF director Jed Dietz said. People had to be turned away from the John Waters pick, "Wanda," the set-in-Baltimore "LUV" and the closing night local premiere of Todd Solondz's "Dark Horse," among other films.

Dietz also estimated that half of the festival's 125 all-access passes were sold even before the weekend's line-up was announced.

The festival, he said, is proving popular with audiences who want to see something outside the Hollywood mainstream.

"I think we've earned the audience's confidence," he said. "There's a lot of film activity out there that people aren't hearing about, and they can sample some of that at the festival."

Advance sales of individual tickets totaled about $27,000, Dietz said. While total numbers won't be tallied for a few days, he estimated overall ticket sales climbed about 15 percent over last year.

Chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
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