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Gypsy Queen Cafe food truck owners to open permanent restaurant

The owners of the Gypsy Queen food truck are putting down roots with a brick-and-mortar restaurant.

The owners of the Gypsy Queen Cafe food truck are getting back to their brick-and-mortar roots with a new restaurant planned near Hampden.

Tom Looney, Annemarie Langton and Ed Scherer are working to open a restaurant, tentatively named The Gypsy's Table, at 3515 Clipper Mill Road. The new eatery will combine the Gypsy Queen's mobile eats with dishes that were on the menu at Helen's Garden, the now-closed Canton restaurant they operated before launching the truck seven years ago.

The restaurant is opening at a space where the Gypsy Queen's two food trucks are stored. (The food trucks will continue operating as normal.) A third truck on-site — larger than the current trucks — will serve as The Gypsy Table's kitchen, a more cost-effective measure than building out a kitchen in the warehouse space, Looney said. 

Looney is targeting a spring opening, pending approval from the city's liquor board. 

The restaurant will be open for lunch and dinner daily, plus brunch hours on weekends, Looney said. It may add breakfast hours based on demand.

The space will seat between 85 and 90 patrons between tables and a bar inside, with additional outdoor seating.

The warehouse will undergo about $225,000 worth of cosmetic renovations before opening, Looney said. Although the outside doesn't look like much, Looney said he's excited to wow guests when they walk inside.

"Where we are now, it’s not pretty," he said. "You’re coming into a yard, basically a warehouse yard."

Looney said he plans to hire about 10 employees to staff the restaurant, some of whom worked at Helen's Garden.

Helen's Garden closed in 2010 due to a health emergency involving one of the owners, Looney said, and the partners opted for the less-complex food truck business. Now, he's looking for a change of pace again.

"The food truck business is actually harder than running a full-service restaurant. It's grueling," Looney said. "It takes a toll physically more so than a restaurant."

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