'The Seagull' ★★★

Thrust together in rehearsal for weeks and then exposed on a naked ramp of wooden boards, the actors in Robert Falls' new production of Anton Chekhov's "The Seagull" know they are part of an experiment. An experiement in depth, in intensity and in a director's reinvention. Falls wants to replace the typical gestalt of a regional theater (short rehearsal time by a one-time-only ensemble) with a show acted with the well-honed certitude of performers who mine every textual nugget and know every vulnerability in the room. Not everything in this "Seagull" works, but there are many moving moments where even the most jaded Chekhov observer will see and, more importantly, feel things that seem like they have never been there before.<br>
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<i>Through Nov. 21 at the <a class="taxInlineTagLink" id="PLCUL000156" title="Goodman Theatre" href="/topic/entertainment/theater/goodman-theatre-PLCUL000156.topic">Goodman Theatre</a>, 170 N. Dearborn St.; $20-$45 at 312-443-3800 and goodmantheatre.org</i>
chi-seagull-capsule

Thrust together in rehearsal for weeks and then exposed on a naked ramp of wooden boards, the actors in Robert Falls' new production of Anton Chekhov's "The Seagull" know they are part of an experiment. An experiement in depth, in intensity and in a director's reinvention. Falls wants to replace the typical gestalt of a regional theater (short rehearsal time by a one-time-only ensemble) with a show acted with the well-honed certitude of performers who mine every textual nugget and know every vulnerability in the room. Not everything in this "Seagull" works, but there are many moving moments where even the most jaded Chekhov observer will see and, more importantly, feel things that seem like they have never been there before.

Through Nov. 21 at the Goodman Theatre, 170 N. Dearborn St.; $20-$45 at 312-443-3800 and goodmantheatre.org

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