Aurora Borealis

Aurora Australis, or the "Southern Lights", glow in the sky over the town of Glenn Ourua near Palmeston North, north of New Zealand's national capital Wellington on April 1, 2001, in the area's most dramatic display since 1989. Auroral activity results from atomic particles spiralling into the earth's north and south polar atmosphere along magnetic field lines and then colliding with atmospheric molecules, resulting in the emission of energy in different forms including light. Four solar flares and a pair of powerful magnetic gas clouds spawned in a monster sunspot are believed to have produced this dazzling display.
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( Reuters / February 10, 2014 )

Aurora Australis, or the "Southern Lights", glow in the sky over the town of Glenn Ourua near Palmeston North, north of New Zealand's national capital Wellington on April 1, 2001, in the area's most dramatic display since 1989. Auroral activity results from atomic particles spiralling into the earth's north and south polar atmosphere along magnetic field lines and then colliding with atmospheric molecules, resulting in the emission of energy in different forms including light. Four solar flares and a pair of powerful magnetic gas clouds spawned in a monster sunspot are believed to have produced this dazzling display.

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