Percy Day

Percy Day, 17 was shot and killed with his cousin, Tyrone Williams, as the two sat on the front steps of he Williams family's two-flat in the 3700 block of West Polk Street in Chicago on Sept. 25, 2009.<br>
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A lone man walked up to the home about 9:15 p.m. and fired more than a dozen shots, said Sharnia Goodman, Day's girlfriend, who was laughing with the victims and Day's younger brother, Pierre, when the shooting started. Several days after the shooting, Chicago police had not identified a motive for the attack, said Officer JoAnn Taylor.<br>
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Day, of the 4300 block of West Walton Street attended DeVry University, where he was in a program to get his high school diploma and an associate's degree, said his father, Percy Day Jr. He also worked at Elmhurst Memorial Hospital preparing meals for patients, and planned to enroll at Michigan State University to get a business degree, his father said. "They were good kids. Good kids," he said. "They rarely ventured past the front steps when they were out here, and we have never had any kind of trouble on this block. It's all turned around. This doesn't make any sense."
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( Family photo )

Percy Day, 17 was shot and killed with his cousin, Tyrone Williams, as the two sat on the front steps of he Williams family's two-flat in the 3700 block of West Polk Street in Chicago on Sept. 25, 2009.

A lone man walked up to the home about 9:15 p.m. and fired more than a dozen shots, said Sharnia Goodman, Day's girlfriend, who was laughing with the victims and Day's younger brother, Pierre, when the shooting started. Several days after the shooting, Chicago police had not identified a motive for the attack, said Officer JoAnn Taylor.

Day, of the 4300 block of West Walton Street attended DeVry University, where he was in a program to get his high school diploma and an associate's degree, said his father, Percy Day Jr. He also worked at Elmhurst Memorial Hospital preparing meals for patients, and planned to enroll at Michigan State University to get a business degree, his father said. "They were good kids. Good kids," he said. "They rarely ventured past the front steps when they were out here, and we have never had any kind of trouble on this block. It's all turned around. This doesn't make any sense."

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