9. The 'Chicago-style' hot dog

Perhaps the most universal description of a Chicago-style hot dog is that it includes no ketchup. In November 1995, Tribune columnist <a class="taxInlineTagLink" id="PECLB004203" title="Mike Royko" href="/topic/arts-culture/mass-media/mike-royko-PECLB004203.topic">Mike Royko</a> denounced Sen. <a class="taxInlineTagLink" id="PEPLT0000017558" title="Carol Moseley Braun" href="/topic/politics/carol-moseley-braun-PEPLT0000017558.topic">Carol Moseley Braun</a> for including ketchup in a recipe that she (or her staff) contributed to a hot dog cookbook. He also didn't like the fact that she omitted celery salt.
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( Bonnie Trafelet, McClatchy-Tribune / May 19, 2008 )

Perhaps the most universal description of a Chicago-style hot dog is that it includes no ketchup. In November 1995, Tribune columnist Mike Royko denounced Sen. Carol Moseley Braun for including ketchup in a recipe that she (or her staff) contributed to a hot dog cookbook. He also didn't like the fact that she omitted celery salt.

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