Dandelion greens

<b>Dandelion greens</b>
One of the first vegetables to come to the farmers market-and your yard-in the spring, dandelion greens are low in calories and high in fiber. But a serving (1 cup) of these dark, leafy greens also has more vitamin A than a cup of cantaloupe and more calcium than spinach, said dietitian Jodi Greebel, president of Citrition, a nutritional counseling practice in New York City. They're also high in iron, other vitamins (including vitamin C), potassium and folate.<br>
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<b>Try them: </b>They're somewhat bitter so you might not want to toss them in salads. Instead, try cooking them with something sweet-say a chicken or pasta dish with tomatoes-or adding nuts and dried fruit, Greebel said. Or saute with garlic and pepper.
chi-dandelion-greens-photo

( Tribune Photo/Bob Fila / April 15, 2009 )

Dandelion greens One of the first vegetables to come to the farmers market-and your yard-in the spring, dandelion greens are low in calories and high in fiber. But a serving (1 cup) of these dark, leafy greens also has more vitamin A than a cup of cantaloupe and more calcium than spinach, said dietitian Jodi Greebel, president of Citrition, a nutritional counseling practice in New York City. They're also high in iron, other vitamins (including vitamin C), potassium and folate.

Try them: They're somewhat bitter so you might not want to toss them in salads. Instead, try cooking them with something sweet-say a chicken or pasta dish with tomatoes-or adding nuts and dried fruit, Greebel said. Or saute with garlic and pepper.

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