"Freud's Couch, Scott's Buttocks, Bronte's Grave" (University of Chicago Press) by Simon Goldhill. Nov. 15

The 19th century was the great age of literary tourism, when besotted readers flocked to the homes of their literary crushes. Stratford-upon-Avon went from a sleepy village to a drama fan's Disneyland; the lonely moors over which Charlotte and Emily Bronte once roved began to lure the multitudes. Goldhill, classics professor at the University of Cambridge and author of the marvelous polemic "Love, Sex, and Tragedy: How the Ancient World Shapes Our Lives" (2004), travels to these spots of worship -- and does so, as much as possible, using Victorian-era transport.
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The 19th century was the great age of literary tourism, when besotted readers flocked to the homes of their literary crushes. Stratford-upon-Avon went from a sleepy village to a drama fan's Disneyland; the lonely moors over which Charlotte and Emily Bronte once roved began to lure the multitudes. Goldhill, classics professor at the University of Cambridge and author of the marvelous polemic "Love, Sex, and Tragedy: How the Ancient World Shapes Our Lives" (2004), travels to these spots of worship -- and does so, as much as possible, using Victorian-era transport.

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