The Armoury What's new with Baltimore sports apparel maker Under Armour

Lindsey Vonn discusses Under Armour’s early days and how company has changed

The first shot of Lindsey Vonn shows a long scar running down her arm.

The skier says that’s what she likes about the video that Under Armour recently released as part of its “Unlike Any” women’s marketing campaign.

“It accentuates not just my strengths, but also my weaknesses and my story and coming back from adversity,” she said in an interview. “I’m strong because of everything I’ve been through.”

Under Armour, which announces its third-quarter earnings next week following consecutive quarterly losses, has identified its women’s lines as growth opportunities.

The company – which hit $1 billion in women’s sales in 2016 out of $4.8 billion total revenues – has acknowledged that more can be done to appeal to women. Vonn, a 2010 Olympic champion who will who will participate in the Winter Games in South Korea in February, is part of that marketing effort.

She missed the 2014 Olympics because of a serious knee injury – one of a number of injuries she has endured. The recent video, part of Under Armour’s campaign featuring women athletes, shows the arm she broke while training last year.

“I’m actually the longest-standing Under Armour athlete they have,” said Vonn, who signed with the company in 2006. “Under Armour was totally different when I started working with them. They barely had a women’s line launched. They didn’t have shoes at the time.”

She said she signed with Under Armour, then just 10-years-old, because “I wasn’t interested in being another athlete from another company that didn’t give two hoots about me.”

Vonn said she is receiving a special perk from the company during the upcoming Olympics in PyeongChang – a personal chef.

“I’ll be able to get the exact menu that I need to perform my best,” she said.

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