Ship-breaking in Bangladesh

A worker carries a piece of iron at a ship-breaking yard in Chittagong, Bangladesh. Bangladesh is dependent on ship-breaking for its domestic steel requirements. According to a report by the Bangladesh Institute of Labor Studies, around 30,000 workers are employed in the ship-breaking industry in Chittagong, a highly polluted coastal belt of around 20 km, and environmental organizations have said that the number of accidents and casualties at the yard is believed to be the highest in the region. International attention has been focused on workers' safety in Bangladesh since the disaster at Rana Plaza, a garment factory complex which collapsed in April, killing 1,132 workers.

( Andrew Biraj/Reuters )

A worker carries a piece of iron at a ship-breaking yard in Chittagong, Bangladesh. Bangladesh is dependent on ship-breaking for its domestic steel requirements. According to a report by the Bangladesh Institute of Labor Studies, around 30,000 workers are employed in the ship-breaking industry in Chittagong, a highly polluted coastal belt of around 20 km, and environmental organizations have said that the number of accidents and casualties at the yard is believed to be the highest in the region. International attention has been focused on workers' safety in Bangladesh since the disaster at Rana Plaza, a garment factory complex which collapsed in April, killing 1,132 workers.

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