How to avoid outliving your retirement savings

Dear Liz: The wife and I are both 65. We both work, with a combined income of $125,000, of which we spend almost all. We have $550,000 in IRAs and $1 million in other investments, plus home equity of about $500,000. We’ll get $3,800 from Social Security if we start next year but plan to work until age 67. Should we wait until then to claim?

Answer: Both of you needn’t wait, but one of you should — the one who has the larger benefit.

As a married couple, you can get two checks — either two retirement benefits, or a retirement benefit and a spousal benefit that can equal up to half the primary retirement benefit. When one of you dies, the survivor will receive only one benefit, which will be the larger of the two checks you received as a couple.

It makes sense to maximize that benefit by waiting as long as possible to claim so that it can grow. After your full retirement age, which is currently 66, unclaimed retirement benefits grow by 8% each year you wait, until maxing out at age 70.

You have substantial investments that should sustain a comfortable retirement, but plenty of things could go wrong.

The fact you’re spending all your current income is worrisome. If you don’t ratchet back your consumption a bit at retirement, you may draw down your investments at a rate that isn’t sustainable. (Depending on your investment mix, an initial withdrawal rate of 3% or 4% usually is considered “safe,” or the most you should take to minimize the odds of running out of money.)

Even if you do rein in your regular spending, bad markets or unexpected expenses could cause you to exhaust your savings faster than you expect. The longer you live, the greater the odds you’ll run short of money. Maximizing one of your Social Security benefits can be a smart way to ensure you, or your survivor, have more income when you may need it most.

Before you retire, you should consult a fee-only financial planner about the best ways to tap your retirement accounts and claim Social Security.

Authentication apps can help thwart hackers

Dear Liz: I’ve heard that authentication apps are a better way to go than two-factor authentication that texts codes to your cell phone. Can you explain more?

Answer: Two-factor authentication adds an additional layer of security to financial, email, social media, cloud storage and other accounts. The first factor is something you know, which is a typically a password, and the second is something you have, such as a code that’s texted to you or generated by a device or authentication app.

The second factor is important, since passwords can be guessed or stolen in database breaches. Texted codes can be intercepted by hackers, so security experts recommend using an authenticator. Three popular apps are Google Authenticator, LastPass Authenticator and Microsoft Authenticator.

To use an authenticator, you must first enable two-factor authentication on the account you want to protect. Unfortunately, not every account provider offers two-factor authentication, although they should. You can find whether yours does at twofactorauth.org.

If the account provider supports authentication, you’ll typically be asked to take a snapshot of a QR code using the authenticator app to establish a connection between your account and the app. When you later log in to those sites, you’ll be asked to type in the code randomly generated by the app.

Any security approach can be thwarted, but the idea behind two-factor authentication is making your accounts hard enough to crack that most hackers will move on to an easier target.

Here’s how to find that annual free credit report

Dear Liz: Please tell me the website for the free credit check. At a department store checkout counter, a stranger's name came up connected to my cellphone number. I think I should check my credit reports, but I don't want to pay for what I understand I can get free.

Answer: It’s entirely possible a clerk simply made a mistake in entering another customer’s phone number. But you should be checking your credit reports regularly anyway, and this is as good an excuse to do so as any. The federally mandated free site can be found at www.annualcreditreport.com. Searching for “free credit reports” can turn up a number of other sites, so make sure you use the correct one.

Liz Weston, certified financial planner, is a personal finance columnist for NerdWallet. Questions may be sent to her at 3940 Laurel Canyon, No. 238, Studio City, CA 91604, or by using the "Contact" form at asklizweston.com. Distributed by No More Red Inc.

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