Unions announce wage increases at Horseshoe Casino under new contract

Table games dealers at Horseshoe Casino Baltimore, whose earnings come mainly from tips, are getting at least a 10 percent increase in hourly pay under a newly ratified contract negotiated by owner Caesar’s Entertainment and the National Gaming Workers’ Coalition, the coalition announced Thursday.

The group of five unions had said Tuesday that it successfully unionized about 1,000 gaming and food and beverage workers at the casino and negotiated a five-year contract that took effect this month.

“We’ve improved our working conditions across the board with this contract,” Aaron Carter, bargaining committee chairman of UAW Local 17, said in an announcement Thursday. “This contract will help our members to have jobs that can support a family.”

The 570 table games dealers will see increases to $6.30 an hour on average, plus up to an additional $1.75 an hour depending on knowledge of a variety of games.

For casino employees that count on tips for the majority of their wages, pay increased from a range of $3.72 an hour to $10.76 an hour to a range of $4.66 an hour to $11.20 an hour this month. In October 2021, that range will increase to $7.90 an hour to $12.53 an hour. Wages for non-tipped casino employees increased from a range of $9.25 an hour to $27 an hour to a range of $10.56 an hour to $29.15 an hour this month. That range increases to $14.67 an hour to $31.39 an hour in October 2021.

The coalition is made up of Unite Here Local 7, which represents food and beverage workers, slot attendants, cleaners and stewards, the UAW, which represents table games dealers and poker room dealers and dual-rate dealers; the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees Local 19, which represents audio visual technicians and stage hands, the International Brotherhood of Teamsters Local 355, which represents parking attendants, drivers and warehouse workers; and the International Union of Operating Engineers Local 37,which represents slot machine technicians.

Under the contract, employees will move from a health plan requiring deductibles ranging from $1,350 to $3,300 a year to a Kaiser Permanente plan that requires no deductible and has lower out of pocket costs. The casino also agreed that jobs should be full time to the extent permitted by business and staffing needs. The casino also will contribute to a Taft-Hartley fund administered by union and employee trustees that offers scholarships to the children and grandchildren of members and pays for training for members.

lorraine.mirabella@baltsun.com

twitter.com/lmirabella

Copyright © 2017, The Baltimore Sun, a Baltimore Sun Media Group publication | Place an Ad
36°