Roughly Speaking podcast: Halloween special: Best of horror movie music (episode 168)

A molecular gastronomist's easy chicken

Ferran Adria is known for his wildly inventive creations at the restaurant El Bulli in Spain, but according to author Anya von Bremzen, he's also known for creating easy cuisine. This dish dresses up a supermarket-bought rotisserie chicken (the savior of many a busy family's dinner) with dried fruit in an easy sauce. It's great for a family dinner or a dinner party; just go easy on the sauce if little ones like their chicken plain.

Here's how to make it:

Ferran Adria's Rotisserie Chicken

Serves 4

1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil

1/2 cup pitted prunes

1/2 cup dried apricots

1/4 cup pitted dried sour cherries

2 tablespoons pine nuts

1 strip orange zest, 4 inches, white pith removed

1 strip lemon zest, 4 inches, white pith removed

1/2 cup tawny port

1 small cinnamon stick

2/3 cup chicken stock or broth

1 store-bought rotisserie chicken, about 3 1/2 pounds, cut into 8 pieces, juices reserved

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees.

Heat the olive oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the prunes, apricots, cherries, pine nuts, and orange and lemon zests and cook, stirring, until the pine nuts turn golden and the fruits are browned in spots, 3 to 5 minutes. Add the port and cinnamon stick and cook until syrupy, about 5 minutes. Add the chicken stock and the chicken juices. Increase the heat to high, bring the sauce to a boil, and cook until reuced, about 5 minutes.

Place the chicken pieces in a baking dish that can hold them snugly. Pour the sauce over them, scraping up all the friut and liquid from the bottom of the skillet and turning the chicken to coat it with the sauce. Bake the chicken until it is warmed through and the sauce is further reduced, about 10 minutes. Transfer to plates and serve at once.

From "The New Spanish Table," by Anya von Bremzen

658 calories, 34 grams fat, 52 grams protein, 8 grams saturated fat, 32 grams carbohydrate, 3 grams fiber, 157 milligrams cholesterol, 221 milligrams sodium. Analysis by registered dietitian Jodie Shield.

(Photo by me)

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