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What a Wonderful World


A nonlethal weapon that uses electromagnetic radiation to inflict excruciating pain has been certified as safe for use by U.S. armed forces. The vehicle-mounted Active Denial System, or ADS, uses waves slightly shorter than microwaves to cause an intense burning sensation on the skin; human test subjects could endure no more than five seconds of exposure. The weapon, when and if it is deployed, is most likely to be used in crowd-control scenarios. (Wired.com)

More than 100,000 personal computers are entering Nigeria's port city of Lagos every month. Unfortunately, 75 percent of those computers are entering the country as waste bound for landfills. (AllAfrica.com)

The Kenyan parliament recently voted to raise the annual compensation of President Emilio Mwai Kibaki from about $27,000 to just over $46,000. (The Daily Nation/Nairobi)

Cell phones have been banned from Greek schools after students allegedly used a camera phone to record the rape of a 16-year-old girl at a school on the island of Evia. (BBC)

A 3-year-old boy was killed by a pig in Delhi, India. When his mother went to look for him, she discovered not only that he had been killed, but that he pig had partially eaten the body. (IndiaeNews.com)

A British researcher says that people can catch Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease--aka the human form of "mad cow disease"--via blood transfusions, likely from people who do not even know that they're infected. Sixty-six people are believed to have contracted the disease from blood transfusions so far. (The Guardian/United Kingdom)

Ebola virus may have killed as many as 95 percent of the gorillas in a wildlife sanctuary in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, or as many as 5,500 animals, over the past four years. Biologist Peter Walsh, who conducted the survey, believes that as many as one-quarter of the world's gorilla population may have succumbed to the disease over the past 10 years. (NewScientistTech.com)

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
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