A half-century after MLK's death is Baltimore less segregated? Yes and no.

Tim Smith

Writer

Tim Smith is The Sun’s fine arts critic, covering classical music, theater and visual arts. Before starting at The Sun in 2000, Smith was classical critic for the Sun-Sentinel in South Florida, where he also contributed to NPR. He's written for The New York Times and BBC Music Magazine, and he's a contributor to Opera News. His book, The NPR Curious Listener's Guide to Classical Music (Perigee, 2002), can be found on the most discerning remainder racks.

Recent Articles

  • Joyous Beethoven 7th caps colorful BSO program

    Joyous Beethoven 7th caps colorful BSO program

    The latest Baltimore Symphony Orchestra program is a one-from-Column-A, one-from-Column-B concoction — something nominally Spanish, but actually Russian (Rimsky-Korsakov's "Capriccio Espagnol"); something British (the infrequently encountered Violin Concerto by William Walton); something solidly...

  • Spotlighters Theatre to give 'Threepenny Opera' a Baltimore twist

    Spotlighters Theatre to give 'Threepenny Opera' a Baltimore twist

    "The Ballad of Mack the Knife" is nothing if not double-edged. The song's instantly catchy melody, colorful lyrics and irresistible sway make it easy to forget that the subject is an amoral fellow who kills and defiles at will. That fellow is at the heart of a brilliantly subversive work of theater...

  • A mostly sturdy, dry-eyed 'Pathetique' from the BSO

    A mostly sturdy, dry-eyed 'Pathetique' from the BSO

    Things might be terribly testy at the highest governmental levels, but there was a perfectly cordial Russian-American relationship going on here over the weekend. Moscow-born Dima Slobodeniouk was on the podium of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra to conduct one of the best-loved works by Russia's...

  • A wintry sampling of music, theater events in Baltimore

    A wintry sampling of music, theater events in Baltimore

    With winter settling in, here's my second annual sampling of potentially hot classical concerts and theater productions that just might help you feel toasty during the cold weeks that lie ahead: Instead of curling up by the fire with a Charles Dickens novel, you can see one brought to life onstage...

  • Highlights from Baltimore's 2016 classical music scene

    Highlights from Baltimore's 2016 classical music scene

    As 2016 draws to a close (not a minute too soon for some of us), I'm reminded of the year's classical music highlights in Baltimore. The most unusual event for me came early in January, when the Peabody Institute hosted the ambitious New Music Gathering. At a program devoted to works embracing...

  • Homage and warning in William Christenberry's look at the Deep South

    William Christenberry didn't have perfect sight — the result of a serious eye injury when he was a teen — but the Alabama-born artist possessed extraordinary insight. His primary focus was the Deep South, a focus that can be explored in a retrospective at the Maryland Institute College of Art: "Laying-by...

  • Homage and warning in William Christenberry's look at the Deep South

    Homage and warning in William Christenberry's look at the Deep South

    William Christenberry didn't have perfect sight — the result of a serious eye injury when he was a teen — but the Alabama-born artist possessed extraordinary insight. His primary focus was the Deep South, a focus that can be explored in a retrospective at the Maryland Institute College of Art:...

  • A peerless 'Guide to Love and Murder'

    A peerless 'Guide to Love and Murder'

    When so many musicals repackage jukebox hits or offer vapid scores that sound as if they were written using some aural equivalent of paint-by-numbers, "A Gentleman's Guide to Love and Murder" cannot help but stand out. This exceedingly imaginative work, 2014 Tony Award-winner for best musical,...

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