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The Baltimore Sun

Andrea K. McDaniels

Writer

Andrea K. McDaniels is an award winning health and medicine reporter at The Baltimore Sun, where she writes about the latest medical advances. She has also covered minority and small business, manufacturing, retail and marketing since coming to the newspaper in 2001. A native of Virginia, McDaniels moved around a lot as a kid. She has lived in Baltimore longer than anywhere else in life. She has a fascination with fitness, diseases, medicine and other health-related topics. An exercise fanatic, she's probably tried just about every fitness activity there is. Her favorites are running, hot yoga and kickboxing. Before coming to The Sun she worked the Charlotte Observer and The New York Times.

Recent Articles

  • As their numbers grow, centenarians get more company

    As their numbers grow, centenarians get more company

    Each Thursday, Dr. Walter Ehrlich can be found along busy 41st Street in Roland Park, surrounded by signs protesting excessive war and expressing concerns about climate change. The 100-year-old regularly talks with family on Skype, sends emails, and recently learned to use the Uber transportation...

  • Survey shows prevalence of violence in lives of Baltimore students

    Survey shows prevalence of violence in lives of Baltimore students

    When the familiar pop-pop sound rang out late Friday afternoon, Tyrese Carter and his friend Destiny McIntosh were watching television in his family's apartment. As gunshots are so common in their neighborhood, they joked that that was probably the sound they heard. Tyrese calmly sauntered to the...

  • Health officials expect Zika virus to reach Maryland

    Health officials expect Zika virus to reach Maryland

    As carriers of the Zika virus get closer to Maryland, the state health department said Friday it is keeping in close contact with federal health officials about spread of the disease and will soon begin testing people who have traveled to regions where it is prevalent. No cases have been diagnosed...

  • UMBC researcher works on faster STD test seen as key to prevention

    UMBC researcher works on faster STD test seen as key to prevention

    Doctors who see patients for sexually transmitted diseases often encounter a problem: Some people don't come back for their test results and therefore don't get treated. That lack of follow-up is one reason why the three most common sexually transmitted diseases — chlamydia, gonorrhea and syphilis...

  • Maryland cancer centers pushing for more use of HPV vaccine

    Maryland cancer centers pushing for more use of HPV vaccine

    Sixty-nine top cancer centers from around the country have joined forces to urge more widespread use of the vaccine to treat the human papillomavirus, which can lead to deadly cervical, throat and other cancers. The centers, including the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins...

  • Bladder cancer often misdiagnosed as simple infection

    Bladder cancer often misdiagnosed as simple infection

    Bladder cancer is one of the more common types of cancer, but it often gets confused with an easily treatable infection. The cancer is far from easy to treat and, if caught in the most advanced stages, could even lead to removal of the bladder. Dr. Jenny J. Kim, a medical oncologist who recently...

  • Future of Chestertown hospital in question

    Future of Chestertown hospital in question

    Susan DeSimone has visited the hospital in Chestertown so many times "she could drive there blindfolded." She and her husband moved to the Heron Point retirement community in 2013 in large part because it was just blocks from the University of Maryland Shore Medical Center at Chestertown. "When...

  • Study finds minority, poor women not getting safer minimally invasive hysterectomies

    Study finds minority, poor women not getting safer minimally invasive hysterectomies

    When Bonita "Bonnie" Hudak had a hysterectomy three years ago after being diagnosed with endometrial cancer, she recovered faster and suffered less pain than when she delivered a child by cesarean section many years before. The C-section required a large cut that took weeks to heal and left an unattractive...

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