Hopewell Iron Furnace's stoves helped keep settlers warm

In the cast house surrounding the furnace stack, molders cast iron into stove plates as well as cannons and cannonballs. Behind it is the building housing the water wheel which provided the blasts of air needed to raise the furnace¿¿¿s temperature to more than 2800 degrees F. Also in the photo is the bridge house that contained the charcoal, limestone and iron ore needed to make pig iron as well as castings for metal stoves.
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( DIANE STONEBACK / THE MORNING CALL )

In the cast house surrounding the furnace stack, molders cast iron into stove plates as well as cannons and cannonballs. Behind it is the building housing the water wheel which provided the blasts of air needed to raise the furnace¿¿¿s temperature to more than 2800 degrees F. Also in the photo is the bridge house that contained the charcoal, limestone and iron ore needed to make pig iron as well as castings for metal stoves.

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